Karaweik Hall

We attended an amazing night of never-ending food and a lovely three hour cultural dance show at the Karaweik Hall floating barge restaurant. It’s located in a park with perfect views of the Shwedagon pagoda across the Kandawgyi Royal Lake. So, if you don’t already have reservations at the restaurant, you have to pay an entrance fee just to get in the park.

It seemed like a beautiful place, and if we’d known about it in advance, we probably would have arrived a little earlier to take advantage of the serenely landscaped greenery. Not to mention the impressive views of the barge itself.

The show began at the entrance where we were greeted by people in traditional and ornate costume, demonstrating Myanmar traditions.

The cultural dance show was made up of many short and colorful scenes of traditional Myanmar dance. It reminded me of the Balinese dance show I saw, but it was less stylized.  The end dance was a showcase representation of all 8 ethnicities in the country, and their traditional clothes and work.

The international buffet was terrific, if light on Burmese dishes. We got to sample things like:  green fish ball curry, coconut rice, Singapore style chicken curry, spicy papaya salad, Century old egg salad, yankee potato salad, glass noodle wood ear mushroom broth, a seafood terrine, various breads, roast chicken, Congee, Thai noodles, Taiwanese tofu and mustard greens, Traditional Myanmar tasting plates (coconut rice, butter beans, roasted chilies, cucumber salad,), nasi goreng, garlic butter prawns, sauteed fish, fried hokkein noodles (big round deliciousness), pumpkin soup, mutton with apple gravy, and others I can’t even remember.

Desserts included a delicious sago pudding with coconut sauce, an assortment of fancy little cakes, a coconut pancake crepe to go with ice cream, watermelon and other fruits, and little glutinous rice desserts with a sweet maple sauce.

I also ordered a “spy wine”, which turned out to be a Thai wine cooler. Who knew?

I loved that we got to taste a little of everything, and then head back up again over the course of 3 hours to get seconds of our favorite dishes.

 

We shoveled in as much as we could, but ultimately were defeated by the awesome power of the buffet.  Perhaps even more filling was the realization that at 20,000 kyat, ($24 – ten times the cost of our meal the first night in Yangon) this was a night that most Myanmar people could not indulge in. I really felt like one of the “haves” that night (especially after a very enlightening train trip we had taken earlier in the day). This wasn’t as high-class as, say, the opera, but it was a big event nonetheless.  We were treated like important people of means, instead of backpackers, and all because of our Western levels of disposable income.

I think I got a flavor for what it used to be like for foreign journalists on expense accounts in SE Asia in the old days. It just didn’t feel like real life to be taking part in such a relatively elite event. On the other hand, we were seated next to an enormous group who were celebrating a 1-year-old child’s birthday party, which included little boys running around and jumping on the side of the stage.

And at one point, I spotted a 6-year-old girl taking photos of the show with a DSLR with a fancy zoom lens that I certainly couldn’t afford. I thought at first that her parents were very trusting to let her hold a camera that valuable… until I looked back and saw her father walking up to her with an even pricier camera and realized that the one she was holding must be hers. Wow.  Everything is relative, right?

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5 thoughts on “Karaweik Hall

    • Thank you so much! Though I’m sad that my trip is winding down now, I’m looking forward to being home and getting to try some of the delicious-looking things from your blog!

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